Lead Testing

Lead Testing

Lead can be found in all parts of our environment – the air, the soil, the water, and even inside our homes. Much of our exposure comes from human activities some types of industrial facilities, and past use of lead-based paint in homes. Lead and lead compounds have been used in a wide variety of products found in and around our homes, including paint, ceramics, pipes and plumbing materials, solders, gasoline, batteries, ammunition, and cosmetics.
Lead may enter the environment from these past and current uses.

Who is at Risk?

Children
Lead is particularly dangerous to children because their growing bodies absorb more lead than adults do and their brains and nervous systems are more sensitive to the damaging effects of lead. Babies and young children can also be more highly exposed to lead because they often put their hands and other objects that can have lead from dust or soil on them into their mouths. Children may also be exposed to lead by eating and drinking food or water containing lead or from dishes or glasses that contain lead, inhaling lead dust from lead-based paint or lead-contaminated soil or from playing with toys with lead paint.

The most important step parents, doctors, and others can take is to prevent lead exposure before it occurs.

What are the Health Effects of Lead?

Lead can affect almost every organ and system in your body. Children six years old and younger are most susceptible to the effects of lead.

Even low levels of lead in the blood of children can result in:
Behavior and learning problems
Lower IQ and Hyperactivity
Slowed growth
Hearing Problems
Anemia
In rare cases, ingestion of lead can cause seizures, coma and even death.

If you suspect lead in your home, ASD Environmental can do a test to determine the extent of the problem.

Scott DanciLead Testing